Should you root your android?

Rooting your android gives you full control over your device which can allow you to do things you normally wouldn’t be able to do on a non rooted android. You can permanently delete system apps to free up memory, you can also overclock or underclock the cpu. This all sounds great but there are also disadvantages that come with rooting your android phone. Here we are going to talk about wether rooting a phone is worth it or not and how it impacts the smartphone.

Security

A rooted phone can become infected with malware alot easier than a nonrooted phone. This is because apps can now have root access to the phone which can leak alot of data. It’s recommended to use virus protection if you have a rooted phone. Be very carefull about what apps you download and what sites you visit. Something important to note is that rooted devices can’t follow through with updates on most newer smartphones.

Warranty

Rooting your phone will void your warranty but if you don’t care about that then continue on. You can always unroot your phone but that may be a little annoying if you don’t know what your doing.

Bricked device

A bricked device is another way of saying that a phone has become unusable. If you don’t know what your doing, rooting a phone can brick your device if you aren’t carefull. If you are interested in rooting your phone and aren’t an expert or don’t know one then it’s recommended to use an old android that you don’t really value much. This way if you do end up bricking the phone it’s not a huge loss.

So is rooting your android worth it? It’s more of an opinion. Because of the high risk of malware and lack of updates on some phones I’d go with no, especially if somebody doesn’t really know what they’re doing.

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Which is the best streaming service?

A video streaming service is a platform that allows you to stream movies and TV shows. There are also streaming services that are competing with cable that offer live TV packages such as Sling TV, PlayStation Vue, and Direct TV now. Here is a list of most well known live TV and regular streaming services and how they compare. Regular streaming services such as Netflix and Hulo with be listed as well as live TV services such as Direct TV now and Sling TV. Amazon Fire Stick, Ruko, and other streaming devices will not be listed since they are devices and not services.

Regular streaming services

  • Netflix

Netflix has been around for a long time. It started as a DVD by mail rental service with no late fees. Netflix competed heavily with other rental company’s and eventually turned into a streaming service keeping the DVD rental feature. The price rates are one device in standard definition for $7.99 a month, 2 devices in HD for $10.99 a month, or 4 screen for $13.99 a month with ultra HD which can be utilized using a 4k TV. Netflix is ad free unlike Hulu so no need to worry about ads. Netflix has invested 16 billion into original content making it the serperior choice for high quality original content. The only real downside to Netflix is that TV shows are released in complete seasons taking up to a year to be released unlike Hulu where aired shows can be released the next day.

  • Amazon video

Amazon video is included with a Amazon prime membership which is $12.99 a month. Without prime it is $8.99 per month. The included library comes with a decent amount of ok movies and shows but doesn’t really seem worth it unless included with prime. Additional movies or TV shows have to be rented or bought.

  • Hulu

Hulu is $7.99 per month. It launched in 2008. It is centered more on TV then movies. Hulu shows commercials unless you pay an extra $4 per month which may be a deal breaker for some people. One of Hulus best features is that it airs TV shows in the next day or two from major networks such as ABC, NBC, and FOX. Hulu does an ok job with video quality but unfortunately the quality is not always in HD. Hulu also has a decent selection of anime content.

  • Crackle

Crackle is free so you have nothing to loose by checking it out. For a free service they have a decent selection of movies and shows. There’s nothing to get to excited about but for a free service it’s worth checking out. You may find something that peeps your interest.

Streaming services with live TV

  • Hulu with live TV

Hulu live TV comes bundled with Hulus existing on demand library along with live TV for $39.99. It uses a cloud based DVR with 50 hours of storage. You can pay an additional $14.99 a month to extend the DVR storage limit to 200 hours if desired. You can also pay an additional $14.99 per month to watch Hulu with live TV on as many devices as you want, or $19.99 for both features. You still have to pay an additional $4 a month to get rid of ads. Hulu with live TV offers around 60 channels. Viacom channels like Comedy Central, MTV, Spike, and others aren’t included.

  • Direct TV now

AT&Ts new live TV streaming service. The app is buggy on mobile devices. 100+ channels. Has the best channel selection. Includes Viacom channels like Spike and MTV. Has a good channel guide. Direct TV now does not offer consel apps. Plays most content in consistent HD. Rates start at $35 per month which includes 60 channels. The next step up is the just right plan at $50 per month with 80 channels. The go big is $60 per month with over 100 channels. And finally, the gotta have it plan, with over 120 channels adding eight starz channels. Avaible on Android, iOS, latest Apple TV, Firestick, and Chromecast. Ruko is not compatible yet.

  • PlayStation Vue

Good value starting at $30 per month. Has primetime broadcast shows from all major networks. Includes ESPN, regional networks, and news channels. A $10 per month sports package adds multiple sports channels like NFL red zone. PS Vue supports 60 fps on most channels. Includes 28 day DVR with unlimited storage free of charge. The DVR is relatively simple to use and navigate. Has a total of 45+ channels. PS Vue had a great interface on PS4 with a interactive guide that shows you what’s on for the day. Available for Sony smart Tv’s and blu ray players, iOS and Android devices, roku, Chromecast, and Amazon fire TV.

  • Sling TV

The least expensive option at $20 a month. Has alot of add on channels like HBO and starz for $5 per month. Includes a cloud DVR with 50 hours. Available on iOS, Android, Apple TV, Fire TV, Fire Stick, Roku, and Chromecast. Sling TV does not work that well with Xbox one. Sling TV has a partnership with T-Mobile allowing costumers to view content on Sling TV without using their data. Sling TV Offers alot for such a low price.

  • Fubo TV

Fubo TV puts a primary focus on sports channels but still offers other channels. Even though it is aimed towards sports it still doesn’t offer ESPN channels which can be a significant factor for many people. For the first two months Fubo TV costs $19.99. After the first two months the price gets raised to 39.99 a month. Fubo TV is a decent service, especially for sports fans with the exception of not including ESPN.

So for a streaming service Netflix is definitely the best choice. Netflix also has ad free viewing. A big plus for Hulu is that it can have shows the day after they are aired as aposed to Netflix having seasons released at one time taking up to a year. Netflix still wins due to original content and overall selection but the rate of TV show releases can be a factor for alot of people. Amazon video isn’t really recommended unless you already have Amazon prime.

For live TV because of the price selection and add ons I’d have to go with Sling TV. Direct TV is a close second a long with PlayStation Vue. In the end people’s opinions may differ so feel free to check out multiple services. Some offer free trials such as Netflix.

What is Linux?

Before we get started let’s take a look at the history behind Linux. Linux is based off the Unix kernel. The Unix kernel was implemented in 1969 at AT&Ts Bell Laboratories by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, Douglas Mcllroy, and Joe Ossanna in 1971. Unix was written entirely in assembly language. It was rewritten in C by Dennis Ritchie in 1973.

Linux was then Created by Linus Torvalds in 1991. Linux is a free, open source operating system just like Windows OS or Mac OS. Linux is written in mostly C and some assembly. The OS source code can be modified for commercial or noncommercial use. Linux is used in all sorts of electronics such as phones, cars, refrigerators, DVRs, routers, and other devices. Linux is also used in supercomputers and servers. Android OS is based on the Linux kernel.

Linux uses different versions of Linux called distributions or distros for short. Linux distros are also lightweight and less resource heavy compared to Windows OS making most distros run fast on even lower end computers. Linux distros can be downloaded onto a usb drive or CD for free, or the CD can be purchased if desired. Unetbootin is a good program used to create Linux usb drives and CDs. Some popular Distros are Arch Linux, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, and Mint. All distros are built around the Linux kernel.

Linux is very hands on making it a slightly less user friendly depending on the distro that you’re using. Installing programs(referred to as packages)can be a little difficult at first. Linux is alot harder to infect with hardware compared to Windows making it a relatively safe OS. Unlike Windows, Linux is case sensitive. A file with the name File.jpg and a file with the name file.jpg are two completely different files.

So it turns out Linux is used alot for alot of devices and super computers as well as being a desktop OS. Should you use Linux? After some getting used to it’s a decent desktop that is relatively secure. It’s free so you have nothing to loose. You can keep Windows on your computer when you install Linux giving your computer the option to use ether operating system. Installation guides can be found online.